Confidence

Lauren quietly sat in the back of the classroom, not engaging with students around her and never offering to raise her hand to respond in class. She felt so inadequate in the responses she thought of, or her answers were already shared by the time she worked up the confidence to raise her hand. Lauren’s slow processing speed along with her dyslexia constantly interfered in her engagement in learning like other students. She was certainly at disadvantage on the average, but with the advent of immediacy in our culture she was distinctly but unintentionally left out.

Broken

Caleb seemed to learn well when he was at home and in the orchard because there was always time to practice and get it right. But at school, it was a different thing, Caleb never felt like he had mastery of anything. He was so convicted by his learning between home and school. He did not let his parents know; as they thought he learned just fine. But with the school year winding down and the orchard needing attention, Caleb’s frustration grew. He finally had had enough. One evening he asked his parents if he could be homeschooled.

Strange

Tess had always felt that she was strange, because of the way others reacted to her. She had difficulty making and keeping friends, because of her perception of how they saw her. Tess just wanted to have good friends, but always seemed to be outside the popular kids and isolated from the relationships that seemed to mean anything at school. She kept these feelings to herself putting on a strong front despite her perceived weaknesses.

Letter

As the school year progressed, Denver became more and more dissatisfied with his performance on tests and homework. He wanted so for it to match his abilities with the times where he can show his skills hands-on. At one-point Denver decided there was something wrong with him, and he began to investigate the source of his difficulties. He started reading about reading differences, and one term kept being used to describe this problem. The word was dyslexia. Denver asked his parents about dyslexia, and they agreed it was not familiar to either of them.

Child of Promise

James’s writing assignment was open-ended in terms of theme, and structure. Students had plenty of leeways to take it in any direction. James had recently spent some time in a bible study which had focused on Galatians, and specifically chapter four. James was drawn to verse twenty-eight of that chapter which suggests we are children of promise. James wanted to use this to compose an essay, which would argue that dyslexia was not a disqualifying for being a child of promise.