Confidence

Lauren quietly sat in the back of the classroom, not engaging with students around her and never offering to raise her hand to respond in class. She felt so inadequate in the responses she thought of, or her answers were already shared by the time she worked up the confidence to raise her hand. Lauren’s slow processing speed along with her dyslexia constantly interfered in her engagement in learning like other students. She was certainly at disadvantage on the average, but with the advent of immediacy in our culture she was distinctly but unintentionally left out.

Broken

Caleb seemed to learn well when he was at home and in the orchard because there was always time to practice and get it right. But at school, it was a different thing, Caleb never felt like he had mastery of anything. He was so convicted by his learning between home and school. He did not let his parents know; as they thought he learned just fine. But with the school year winding down and the orchard needing attention, Caleb’s frustration grew. He finally had had enough. One evening he asked his parents if he could be homeschooled.

Raising Spencer

After they’d arrived back home, and had put Spencer to bed, Sandy sat with Ben who was preparing for Monday’s lessons at work. She broached his experiences in school first to learn more about how he struggled. Ben shared his difficulty with language. He said I thought you knew since I still have some weaknesses. Sandy honestly hadn’t put much thought to it; she’d just been helpful to her love. When Ben had shared without emotion about his own problems, she felt much more comfortable with sharing what she’d learned about Spencer. Sandy told Ben about her conversation with Spencer’s teacher. She asked him if he’d noticed the change in Spencer too?

Letter

As the school year progressed, Denver became more and more dissatisfied with his performance on tests and homework. He wanted so for it to match his abilities with the times where he can show his skills hands-on. At one-point Denver decided there was something wrong with him, and he began to investigate the source of his difficulties. He started reading about reading differences, and one term kept being used to describe this problem. The word was dyslexia. Denver asked his parents about dyslexia, and they agreed it was not familiar to either of them.

Visual Myths

When Helena now in second-grade, wears her hair in a pony with a large ribbon, and her favorite outfit for school. The school suggested that she might benefit from using colored overlays, as she was struggling with reading. Mom and Dad not knowing any better said yes. The overlays proved to be exciting for Helena and for a while she improved a little. But once it became routine her gains quickly disappeared.