Confidence

Lauren quietly sat in the back of the classroom, not engaging with students around her and never offering to raise her hand to respond in class. She felt so inadequate in the responses she thought of, or her answers were already shared by the time she worked up the confidence to raise her hand. Lauren’s slow processing speed along with her dyslexia constantly interfered in her engagement in learning like other students. She was certainly at disadvantage on the average, but with the advent of immediacy in our culture she was distinctly but unintentionally left out.

Child of Promise

James’s writing assignment was open-ended in terms of theme, and structure. Students had plenty of leeways to take it in any direction. James had recently spent some time in a bible study which had focused on Galatians, and specifically chapter four. James was drawn to verse twenty-eight of that chapter which suggests we are children of promise. James wanted to use this to compose an essay, which would argue that dyslexia was not a disqualifying for being a child of promise.

Condemned

During first semester her Social Studies teacher, was relentless in his demands on his students, no matter their ways of learning. He kept a pace which was quick by anyone’s standards. He moved on to new material assuming concepts, dates, and facts were understood. This quickly put Francine behind and created a disconnect for her and her teacher.

Grammar

On their next check-up with their doctor, they addressed their concern for his language development, as he was nearing eighteen months old. The doctor did his usual exam and records check before hearing the parent’s concerns. He spoke to the child to see what he could generate from him directly but got just what the parents had reported. He checked the child’s hears again and suggested he order an audiology exam to rule out a hearing loss. Bret’s parents agreed with this approach and were hopeful it would prove helpful.

Figuratively Speaking

“The sun in the west was a drop of burning gold that slid near and nearer the sill of the world.”
—Lord of the Flies, William Golding

William Golding’s use of metaphor for the reader who understands the figurative references is beautiful. But someone like me who saw words like “burning gold” or “nearer the sill of the world” became easily confused. Images of “flaming gold” and “a window sill” do not bring great meaning or enjoyment from Golding’s choice of expression. As someone who did not get this sort of thing, my strategy was to read without gathering meaning.